• Film Screening of “No Asylum: The Untold Chapter of Anne Frank’s Story” at HMTC

    The Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center’s David Taub Reel Upstanders Film Series presents a screening of the film, No Asylum: The Untold Chapter of Anne Frank’s Story, on Sunday, March 12, 2017, at 12:30 p.m., at HMTC, Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove, NY.

    The film is about the stunning discovery of lost letters by Anne Frank’s father, Otto, which reveal an unknown chapter of their family’s life. There will be a discussion following the film with Joan Adler, author of For the Sake of the Children: The Letters between Otto Frank and Nathan Straus, Jr.

    There is a requested donation of $10. RSVP to Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org. Reel Upstanders was established in honor of David Taub (1932-2010), a Holocaust Survivor and respected friend to HMTC.

  • Toby Tobias to Perform “Journey from Johannesburg” at HMTC

    South African born songwriter and musician, Toby Tobias, shares his personal story of hope during a time of division, war and upheaval across three continents during a performance of Journey from Johannesburg, Sunday, March 5, 2017 at 2 p.m., at the Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center of Nassau County, Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove, NY.

    Toby Tobias’s life story, captured in his original music, begins in Johannesburg, South Africa under apartheid rule, then continues in Israel as it battled for its own identity, and finally to America where he makes his home. In this special performance, Toby will be joined by members of Glen Cove’s Calvary A.M.E. Church Choir led by music director , Robert Meeks and Choir Director, Dolores Waller. Huntington based musicians, Mike Nugent on guitar and Richie Guererro, on percussion, will round out the band.

    There is a requested donation of $10. RSVP to Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org.

  • HMTC’s David Taub Reel Upstanders Film Series Presents “No Asylum: The Untold Chapter of Anne Frank’s Story”

    HMTC’s David Taub Reel Upstanders Film Series presents a screening of the film “No Asylum: The Untold Chapter of Anne Frank’s Story,” on Sunday, March 12, 2017, at 12:30 p.m. at HMTC, Welwyn Preseve, 100 Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove, NY. The film is about the stunning discovery of lost letters by Anne Frank’s father, Otto, which reveal an unknown chapter of their family’s life. There will be a discussion following the film with Joan Adler, author of “For the Sake of the Children: The Letters Between Otto Frank and Nathan Straus, Jr.”

    There is a requested donation of $10. RSVP to Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org. The David Taub Reel Upstanders Film Series was established in honor of David Taub (1932-2010), a Holocaust Survivor and respected friend of HMTC.

  • Submissions Due March 10 for HMTC’s 22nd Annual Creative Arts Competition


    One of last year’s Creative Arts Competition winners, Maia Schlusse from HAFTR Cedarhurst, with her artwork, “We Remember.”

    Each year HMTC holds a creative arts competition, open to 5th-12th grade students in Nassau or Suffolk County. The deadline for submission of entries for this year’s competition is March 10, 2017. Categories for which entries can be submitted include poetry, visual arts, photography, music and multi-media (still and video).

    The theme of this year’s competition is “First They Came For…”. What does it mean to stand up for others, to be an ally? What are the obligations and responsibilities involved in being an ally? Martin Niemoller, a German clergyman, famously stated after World War II that when other groups were targeted, he didn’t step in, and when the Nazis came for him, there was no one left to speak up. Art submissions this year should reflect on Niemoller’s Quote and on the consequences of choosing to make a difference, or not.

    An awards ceremony recognizing the winners will take place on Sunday, April 30, 2017 at HMTC. All students who submit an entry will receive a certificate of participation. Group entries will be considered as one entry and the award will go to the submitting school.

    For questions or more information contact Tracy Garrison-Feinberg at (516) 571-8040 or tracygarrisonfeinberg@hmtcli.org. Guidelines for submissions can be found at hmtcl.org/creative-arts-competition.

     

     

  • Applicants Wanted for the 2017 Friedlander and Gillman Awards

    Two Opportunities for Long Island Students to Receive Awards from HMTC


    From the 2016 Tolerance Benefit, pictured are (Top Row L to R: ) Lt. Matthew O’Malley, Suffolk County Police Department; Steven Markowitz, Chairman of the Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center of Nassau County; Tracy Garrison-Feinberg, Director of the Claire Friedlander Education Institute; Det. Lt. Jevier Espinosa, Nassau County Police Department; Peter J. Klein, Claire Friedlander Family Foundation; (Bottom Row L to R: ) Recipients of the 2016 Friedlander Upstander Award – Justin Houston of Melville, Michael Gadinis of Syosset, and Kyle Persaud of Miller Place.

    The Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center of Nassau County (HMTC) annually honors middle school, high school and college students on Long Island who confront intolerance, prejudice or other forms of social injustice. High school and middle school recipients of the Friedlander Upstander Award receive a $2,500 scholarship, and recipients of the Daniel Gillman Goodfellows Award, for college students, will receive a $1,000 award. The awards will be presented at HMTC’s Annual Tolerance Benefit on May 1, 2017.

    The Friedlander Upstander Award, presented by HMTC and the Claire Friedlander Family Foundation, in conjunction with the Nassau and Suffolk County Police Departments, will be awarded to Nassau and Suffolk middle school and high school students who have acted as Upstanders against bullying or intolerance in any of it’s forms. The student’s action as an Upstander could be one of intervention or prevention, big or small. Applications for the Friedlander Upstander Award are due March 1, 2017.

    The Daniel Gillman Goodfellows Award, presented by HMTC and the Gillman family, will be presented to a Long Island college or university student who has demonstrated a commitment to helping others and who has intervened against (or prevented) an act of intolerance or acted in the service of helping others in need. The award memorializes and honors Daniel Gillman, a kind and generous young man who dedicated himself to aiding young people and adults. His altruism was a reflection of the selflessness of the Belgian Rescuers who saved the life of his grandmother during the Holocaust. Applications for the Gillman Award are due April 7, 2017.

    The application for the Friedlander Upstander Award can be found here.

    The application for The Daniel Gillman Goodfellows Award can be found here.

    For more information call (516) 571-8040.

     

  • “After the Silence” edited by Lillian Gewirtzman and Karla Nieraad Available for Purchase

    On Sunday, April 2, 2017, at 2 p.m., HMTC will have a special program about the new book, After the Silence: Reflections of the Descendants, edited by Lillian Gewirtzman and Karla Nieraad. The book is an anthology of personal essays from descendants of Holocaust Survivors and post-war Germans. Eleven Americans and eleven Germans from the collaborators extended circle of contacts wrote about their memories, feelings and recalled stories as children and grandchildren.

    For those who are interested in purchasing the book prior to April 2, you can order the book at amazon.com by doing a search for the book’s ISBN number which is 978-3-86281-106-9. In addition, from everywhere in the world one can order the English version at British amazon.co.uk and at amazon.de from Germany (in the department “fremdsprachige Bücher”).

    Also, the book is available directly from the publisher’s online shop.

    For more information or to RSVP for the April 2 program, call (516) 571-8040.

  • Jewish Heroes of Boxing

    The Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County (HMTC) presents, Max Baer and Barney Ross: Jewish Heroes of Boxing, a lecture and book signing by author Jeffrey Sussman.  The program will take place on Sunday, February 26, 2017, at 2 p.m. at HMTC, Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove, NY 11542.

    Max Baer and Barney Ross: Jewish Heroes of Boxing is about two champions of boxing in the 20’s and 30’s who were an inspiration for Jewish fans across the country and throughout the world. The book paints an evocative picture of boxing and the crucial role it played in an era of rising antisemitism. Though they came from very different backgrounds—Baer grew up on his family’s ranch in California, while Ross, who grew up in an Orthodox family, roamed the tough streets of Chicago and was a runner for Al Capone, both became boxing champions.

    In the book, Sussman discusses how Baer fought Hitler’s favorite boxer, Max Schmeling, in 1933 in front of 60,000 people at Yankee stadium while wearing boxing shorts adorned with a Jewish star. Barney Ross had a trilogy of bouts with Jimmy McLarnin, who was known as the Jew Killer for all the Jewish boxers he had defeated. Ross, whose real name was Rosofsky, beat McLarnin in their first encounter, lost to him in the second, and won in the third. McLarnin’s manager was so upset by the final decision that he sued Ross and his managers, claiming undo Jewish meddling in the decision. The case was laughed out of court.

    Jeffrey Sussman is the author of 11 nonfiction books including No Mere Bagatelles, a biography of handbag designer and Holocaust Survivor Judith Leiber, and his latest book, Max Baer and Barney Ross: Jewish Heroes of Boxing. His first experience with boxing was at the age of 12 when his father took him for 10 boxing lessons at the legendary Stillman’s Gym, where numerous championship boxers trained. He has since written many articles and short stories about boxing and is a regular contributor to the boxing website, boxing.com.

    There is a suggested donation of $10. For more information or to RSVP call Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 x 107 or email dlom@hmtcli.org.

  • Holocaust Organizations, Scholars and Educators Sound Alarm on Surge in Hate Crimes

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    In a powerful statement issued by an array of Holocaust institutions, scholars and educators from around the world, an alarm is being sounded on the rise of groups that promote intolerance and promote hate speech. These 90 institutions and 71 individuals call on lawmakers to condemn white nationalist groups and ask citizens to be vigilant.

    The statement is as follows:

    Recent months have seen a surge in unabashed racism and hate speech – including blatant antisemitism and attacks on Hispanics, Muslims, African-Americans, women, the LGBTQ community, as well as other targeted groups.  Journalists have been threatened.  Places of worship, schools and playgrounds have been defaced with Nazi symbols intended to intimidate and arouse fear.  White supremacist groups have become self-congratulatory and emboldened.

    As Holocaust scholars, educators and institutions, we are alarmed by these trends.  History teaches us that intolerance, unchecked, leads to persecution and violence.  We denounce racism and the politics of fear that fuels it.  We stand in solidarity with all vulnerable groups.  We take Elie Wiesel’s words to heart: “I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation.”

    Therefore, we call upon all elected officials as well as all civic and religious leaders to forcefully and explicitly condemn the rise in hate speech and any attacks on our democratic principles.  We call upon all media and social media platforms to refuse to provide a stage for hate groups and thus normalize their agenda.  And we call upon all people of good conscience to be vigilant, to not be afraid, and to speak out.

    This statement is co-authored by members of the Association of Holocaust Organizations, a network dedicated to the advancement of Holocaust education, remembrance and research, and is affirmed by the following institutions and individuals listed on this link:  http://www.mjhnyc.org/documents/HolocaustOrganizationsandScholarsStatementFINAL.pdf

  • Holocaust Survivor George Oscar Lee Honored by Manhasset-Lakeville Fire Department and Nassau County Police Department

    Recently during the program Law and Order after the Holocaust, George Oscar Lee, a Holocaust Survivor from North Hills, NY, was honored by the Manhasset-Lakeville Fire Department and the Nassau County Police Department for taking it upon himself to create a fire brigade and professionalize the police force in the Föhrenwald Displaced Persons (DP) camp in Germany shortly after liberation.

    img_0112Standing Back Row (L to R): Manhasset-Lakeville Fire Department (MLFD) Firefighters Blaise Christoforatos, Matt Burke, Stephen John, Gary Halitzer, and Doug Hwee. Standing Center Row (L to R):  Beth Lilach, Senior Director of Education and Community Affairs at the Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center of Nassau County (HMTC); Phillis Lee, Professor at Long Island University and George Oscar Lee’s daughter; Steven Markowitz, Chairman of HMTC; Leah Lee, a Holocaust Survivor; George Oscar Lee, a Holocaust Survivor who was honored during the Law and Order After the Holocaust Program by the MLFD and the Nassau County Police Department; Mitchell Littman, George Oscar Lee’s son; Deputy Chief Brian Stone, MLFD; and MLFD firefighters Sunjay Verma, Ex-Captain Matt Newman; Steve Lampert, Lt. Carly Farrone; and Ed Hartrick. Kneeling (L to R): MLFD EMT-CC Mitch Levine, Firefighter Dorin Rusu, EMS Henry Hong and EMS Timothy Hall.

    On his second day in Föhrenwald, George saw smoke coming from one of the survivors’ apartments. He ran in and extinguished the flames. Realizing that the camp lacked a fire brigade, he got permission to form one. He was also disappointed with the few ragtag residents who called themselves police and transformed them into a well-trained, professional police force. This was the first time that George was honored for what he did at Föhrenwald.

    img_0160(L to R): Shevy Berkovits, Detective Sergeant and Deputy Commanding Officer, Community Affairs, Nassau County Police Department congratulates Holocaust Survivor George Oscar Lee. 

    Law and Order after the Holocaust was made possible by the generous support of Astoria Bank.

     

  • Speaker Spotlight: George Oscar Lee

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    George Oscar Lee (middle) with Föhrenwald DP Camp Fire Brigade. Photo courtesy of USHMM.

    This Sunday, November 13, 2016, at 2 p.m. at HMTC, as part of the program Law and Order After the Holocaust, George Oscar Lee, a Holocaust Survivor from Long Island, will be honored by the Manhasset-Lakeville Fire Department and the Nassau County Police Department for taking it upon himself to create a fire brigade and professionalize the police force in the Föhrenwald Displaced Persons (DP) camp in Germany shortly after liberation.

    George Oscar Lee was born Oskar Littman on September 1, 1924 in Drohobycz, Galicia. War broke out on his 15th birthday. Once the Russians took over his town, things were relatively quiet. But that ended in June of 1941, when the Germans re-invaded. Within days, and believing that the Germans would not harm women and children, and that the war would soon end, George and his father took the train east into the Soviet heartland, eventually settling in a collective farm in the Ural mountains.

    Soon, George’s father was taken away to another town to work in a tank factory, while 17-year old George was trained as a fireman on the farm. George was soon denounced as anti-Stalinist and imprisoned. For six months, he was interrogated every night and every night he proclaimed his innocence and reaffirmed his Polish nationality. Eventually, he was released and joined the Polish division of the Russian army as a technical sergeant in the anti-aircraft artillery and was part of the forces that liberated Warsaw in 1945.

    The war ended for him in Berlin and he learned about the deaths of his mother and sister. He made his way to the American zone in Munich and arrived in the Föhrenwald Displaced Persons (DP) camp in 1945, where he remained for the next three years. On his second day in Föhrenwald, George heard a woman yelling “fire.” He ran into her house and doused the flames. After making inquires he soon learned that the camp had no fire department. He asked permission to establish on which was granted. He was also disappointed with the few ragtag residents who called themselves police and transformed them into a well-trained, professional police force.

    Once in the United States, George built a new life. He worked until the age of 70 in sales for a company dealing with polymers. Upon his retirement, he enrolled at Florida International University and took courses in literature. George has written five books, Goat for AzalzelThose Were the Days TovarischUncle BerlRussian Saga and Postcards from Truskawiec Spa. During his working years and throughout his retirement, he has been active in a number of charities focused on wounded Israeli war veterans and the resettlement of Russian Jews among others.

    George will talk about his experiences at Föhrenwald during Sunday’s program and will be available for Q&A. Also speaking on Sunday will be journalist and documentary filmmaker John Friedman, producer of the Academy Award-winning documentary Hôtel Terminus: The Life and Times of Klaus Barbie. He is currently documenting George’s life.

    Law and Order after the Holocaust is made possible by the generous support of Astoria Bank.

    There is a suggested donation of $10 to attend. For more information or to RSVP contact Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org.