• Annual Tolerance Benefit 2019

    Monday, May 6, 2019 | 6:00 PM

    Westbury Manor, 110 Jericho Turnpike, Westbury NY 11590

    $135 per person | Business Attire

    Sponsored By:

    The Claire Friedlander Family Foundation | Mojo-Stumer Associates Sterlingrisk | Insurance Stewart Title

    Ike, Molly, & Steven Elias Foundation | Samar Hospitality

    Purchase your tickets or sponsorship online today!

    http://weblink.donorperfect.com/tolerance2019

    For more information contact Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org.

  • You’re Invited to The Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County’s Tolerance Benefit: “Taste of Long Island” and Silent Auction Monday, May 6, 2019, at 6:00 p.m.

    Glen Cove, NY…  Experience a taste of Long Island’s best restaurants at the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County’s (HMTC) annual Tolerance Benefit: “Taste of Long Island.”  This year’s benefit features a tasting event and silent auction on Monday, May 6, 2019, at 6 p.m. at Westbury Manor, 1100 Jericho Turnpike, Westbury, NY.  In addition, three middle and high-school students will be presented with the Friedlander Upstander Award.

    Bidding at the Silent Auction

    The Tolerance Benefit is a way for donors, volunteers, Holocaust Survivors and members of the community to join together to raise money in support of HMTC’s Holocaust, anti-bias and anti-bullying education programs. Those donations make it possible to provide transportation for school groups to visit HMTC’s world-class museum and to hear first-hand testimony from a Holocaust Survivor and for nurses and law enforcement officers to participate in free training workshops.

    The Friedlander Upstander Award, presented by HMTC and the Claire Friedlander Family Foundation, in conjunction with the Nassau and Suffolk County Police Departments, is awarded to Nassau and Suffolk County middle school and high school students who have acted as Upstanders against bullying or intolerance in any of its forms. Recipients receive a $2,500 scholarship.

    The Tolerance Benefit is sponsored by Samar Hospitality, the Ike, Molly & Steven Elias Foundation, Stewart Title Associates, The Claire Friedlander Family Foundation, and Mojo-Stumer Associates. Other Sponsorship opportunities are available. Tickets are $135 a person and a ten-pack of tickets is available for $1,200. To make a donation or purchase tickets or a sponsorship online visit http://weblink.donorperfect.com/tolerance2019.

    For more information about sponsorship packages and to purchase tickets, contact Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org.

  • Annual Tolerance Benefit: Taste of Long Island

  • You’re Invited to HMTC’s Tolerance Benefit: Made on Long Island, May 16, 2016

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    Experience Long Island artisan made foods and crafts at the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County’s (HMTC) annual Tolerance Benefit: “Made on Long Island.”  This year’s benefit features a tasting event and silent auction on Monday, May 16, 2016, at 6 p.m. at Westbury Manor, 1100 Jericho Turnpike, Westbury, NY.  In addition, three middle and high-school students will be presented with the Friedlander Upstander Award and one Long Island college student will be awarded the Daniel Gillman Goodfellow Award. Money raised at the Tolerance Benefit goes towards Holocaust, anti-bias and anti-bullying education.

    Auction prizes include a VIP wine tastings at a variety of North Fork Vineyards, a $500 gift certificate for the NYC Food & Wine Festival, an autographed script of “When Harry Met Sally,” and a Bertolucci diamond Ladies Watch.

    The Friedlander Upstander Award, presented by HMTC and the Claire Friedlander Family Foundation, in conjunction with the Nassau and Suffolk County Police Departments, is awarded to Nassau and Suffolk County middle school and high school students who have acted as Upstanders against bullying or intolerance in any of its forms. Recipients receive a $2,500 scholarship.

    The Daniel Gillman Goodfellow Award, presented by HMTC and the Gillman family, is given to a college or university student on Long Island who confronted an act of social injustice or intolerance or helped others in need. The recipient will receive a $1,000 award.

    The Tolerance Benefit is sponsored by Spectronics Corporation, Sterling Risk Insurance and Title Associates. Other Sponsorship opportunities are available. Tickets are $125 a person and a ten-pack of tickets is available for $1,125. Tickets may be purchased online at hmtcli.org.

    For more information about sponsorship packages and to purchase tickets, contact Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org.

  • Tell HMTC About Young People Who Are Making a Difference!

    Tell HMTC About Young People Who Are Making a Difference!

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    by Tracy Garrison- Feinberg

    This week we’ve been receiving applications for the 2016 Claire Friedlander Upstander Award, and it’s wonderful to see young people from all over Long Island working to make their communities better in so many different ways. That’s why we take the time to honor a few of these students each year with a $2,500 scholarship, why we try to feature at least one student each month in this blog as Upstander of the Month, and why I’m  thrilled that Newsday is giving us examples on a regular basis of “Students to Watch.”

    Too often we read about negative images of teenagers in our world today: they’re apathetic, they’re only concerned with themselves and their technology, they have no concept of history. The students I see in our education programs prove these stereotypes false every single day. I see young people who are connected, passionate and compassionate, and their stories inspire me daily.

    At HMTC, we teach young people that standing up for others is the best way to stand up against bigotry, hatred or intolerance of any kind. We promote the idea of the “Upstander,” which two New Jersey students felt was so important that they started a campaign to add the word “upstander” to the Oxford English Dictionary. And I know that students across Long Island, in every community, have similar stories of standing up. We want to hear them and share their examples!

    Please be in touch with us about inspiring young people, and watch this space! You’ll see their stories in this blog and later this spring we’ll announce the 2016 Friedlander Upstander Scholars. I look forward to celebrating more Long Island inspiring students!

    Tracy Garrison-Feinberg is director of the Claire Friedlander Education Institute at HMTC. You can contact Tracy at tracygarrisonfeinberg@hmtcli.org. 

  • Friedlander Upstander and Gillman Goodfellow Awards Presented at Tolerance Benefit

    HMTC Chair Steven Markowitz and NCPD Deputy Inspector Gary Shapiro, Upstander Award Winners  Paulina Calcaterra, Shannon Butler, Alexis Wojcik, Peter J. Klein, Tracy Garrison-Feinberg, Director CFEIThe 2015 Friedlander Upstander Awards and the first-ever Daniel Gillman Goodfellow Award were presented on May 4, 2015 at the Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center of Nassau County’s Tolerance Benefit and Auction. Deputy Inspector Gary Shapiro of the Nassau County Police Department was also honored. Receiving the Friedlander Upstander Award were high school students Shannon Butler and Paulina Calcaterra and middle school student Alexis Wojcik. The recipient of the Gillman Goodfellow Award was Scott Gruenewald.

    The Friedlander Upstander Award, made possibly by the generosity of the Claire Friedlander Family Foundation and established as a legacy from Holocaust Survivor Claire Friedlander, provides an educational scholarship of $2,500 and is presented in cooperation with the Nassau and Suffolk County Police Departments.  Shannon Butler, a senior at Bay Shore High School, received the Friedlander Upstander Award due to her work to help change the way special needs students are viewed and treated. Paulina Calcaterra, a senior at North Shore High School, received a Friedlander Upstander Award because she implemented a student forum to foster constructive discussions about issues of race and policing and shared with students her research on 20th century genocides to deepen their understanding of modern history. Alexis Wojcik, an eighth grader at Plainview-Old Bethpage Middle School, received the award for mentoring elementary school students with autism, helping them learn basic skills and socialization.

    HOlocaust Survivor Charlotte Gillman, Daniel Gillman Goodfellow Award Winner, Scott Gruenewald and HMTC Chair Steven MarkowitzStony Brook University student Scott Gruenewald was the recipient of the first-ever Daniel Gillman Goodfellow Award, which was established by Daniel’s grandmother, a Holocaust Survivor, Charlotte Gillman, in his memory. Scott received the  award because of his many years of community service which includes helping the homeless.

    Guests who attended participated in A Taste of Long Island, featuring some of Long Island’s top restaurants and there was also a silent auction and raffle to benefit HMTC.

  • My Greatest Achievement

    Being nominated for the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County’s Friedlander Upstander Award was in itself the greatest honor I have ever received. In the beginning I was told that my chances of actually winning were slim because candidates would span all of Nassau County. I was beyond thrilled that I had been chosen by the Wheatley faculty to represent our school. I knew it was a great opportunity to put my story to writing, and even if I didn’t win, I would still be able to let people read my essay and understand how I have been affected by intolerance.

    After reading my essay, my mother’s eyes filled with tears as it had to do with one of the biggest ways tolerance plays a role in my life — my family. My older brother has Autism, and throughout my whole life I have watched as people thought less of him, told him he couldn’t do something, or just treated him differently from everyone else. He is of course different, but he is just as much a person as anyone else; that is what I try relay to people. He has given me such a gift because I am forced to look at the world in another way— I have been on the other side of intolerance.

    The least I can do is spread the knowledge I have obtained from knowing someone as amazing as my brother. It’s definitely not always easy growing up with him. It makes full family vacations near impossible. Even being all in one car together can be a definite struggle, but my whole family is so proud of where he is today. He holds 3 jobs and is a functional member of society; something many people told him he couldn’t be. Because of him, I always feel the need to step in and give the underdog a fighting chance whenever I can. People shouldn’t be treated any differently or with any less respect simply because they are different.

    Winning this award was such a personal accomplishment. It truly is the best kind of award to receive because it was based on who I am as a person. The award ceremony was one of the best nights of my life— listening to so many inspirational people tell their own stories having to do with intolerance. Reading the plaque I was later given nearly brought me to tears. It listed leadership, courage, and the ability to inspire others as three of the qualities of this award. I felt so honored and met so many amazing people. It is definitely a night I will never forget.

    This fall as part of the award I will also be a part of the HMTC’s Annual Middle School Tolerance Conferences, which I know will be another incredible experience. I am beyond excited to be able to work with these students and pass along lessons I have learned. I would like to thank the HMTC and Claire Friedlander Family Foundation for giving me and opportunity to be a part of such an amazing program.

    – Caitlin Calio
    2013 Friedlander Upstander Award Recipient