• One Clip at a Time: Summer Institute 2019

    Are you ready to change the world?

    Then we are ready to help!  If you are an educator  looking to experience something truly beautiful and educationally compelling…if you are looking to make a lasting difference in your life as an educator and in the live’s of your students, then you should  register now for our Free One Clip Summer Institute

    • This two-day session will be conducted by One Clip/Three Village Educators, Irene Berman and Kate Hunter and will be held at the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County in Glen Cove, New York, Tuesday, July 16 and Wednesday, July 17, 2019.  (9:00 am to 3:00 pm)
    • The first day of the session will include training on the One Clip curriculum, a tour of the museum, and a video conference with the President of One Clip at a Time .
    • The second day will include action planning and implementation, and a survivor testimonial.
    • A conference fee of $400 will be waived for all participating educators
    • The conference includes lunch both days
    • Attendees will receive their own One Clip Kit, which includes a copy of the Paper Clips film, an informational CD, detailed lesson plans, student journals and primary source documents.
    • The Institute addresses the requirements of the Dignity Act directly as well as Common Core Standards.

    Register online today at www.oneclipatatime.org

  • “But When We Started Singing…”

    But When We Started Singing…

    Conceived and performed by Bob Spiotto

    Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Birth of Primo Levi

    Sunday, June 9, 2019 | 2:00 pm

    This one-man performance is inspired by the life and poetry of Holocaust survivor and world-renowned author/poet and Italian/Jew, Primo Levi, 1919-1987 who is known for his works such as, If This Is A Man, The Periodic Table, The Reawakening, and The Drowned and the Saved.

    $10 suggested donation. Please RSVP to (516) 571-8040 or info@hmtcli.org

     HMTC,
    100 Crescent Beach Road
    Glen Cove, NY11542
  • Annual Tolerance Benefit 2019

    Monday, May 6, 2019 | 6:00 PM

    Westbury Manor, 110 Jericho Turnpike, Westbury NY 11590

    $135 per person | Business Attire

    Sponsored By:

    The Claire Friedlander Family Foundation | Mojo-Stumer Associates Sterlingrisk | Insurance Stewart Title

    Ike, Molly, & Steven Elias Foundation | Samar Hospitality

    Purchase your tickets or sponsorship online today!

    http://weblink.donorperfect.com/tolerance2019

    For more information contact Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org.

  • Lessons From the Holocaust: A New Generation Speaks Truth to Power

  • “While There’s Life…” a Book Review by Marcia Posner

    WHILE THERE’S LIFE…

     by Ruth Minsky Sender

    After writing three books, all memoirs : “The Cage,”  “To Life,” (which you may borrow from our library) and “The Holocaust Lady,” Ruth Minsky Sender Sender has recently published a book of poems, mainly written after 1950.  They are poems of the deepest emotions and yes, perhaps trust too. “Each poem is a delicate work of art.” wrote one reviewer. Most have been translated from the Yiddish and a few from the  Polish, during her  incarceration in the Mittelsteine Slave Labor Camp (1944-1945).  She wrote them in a little notebook given to her as a gift by the Nazi Commandant as a reward for entertaining the guards at Christmas, which all 400 Jewish slave labor girls were forced to do. Ruth would also read her poems each Sunday to the 50 other women sharing the room with her.

    Discussing the writing of poetry, has your heart ever been so heavy that you,too, wrote poetry to sustain yourself ? Ruth Minsky Sender was blessed to have a mother who managed to maintain hope, saying: “Where there is life is hope;” even in the camp, until she died. Perhaps that is why Ruth was able to pour out her feelings in poetry written secretly during her stay at the slave labor camp. They were not only poems of despair, but also of infinite wisdom and hope.  As one reviewer wrote: “While There’s Life . . .” is a volume that should be read and re-read by people of all faiths.  It is a portrait not just of survival, but of how one woman transformed her pain in humanity’s darkest hour into art. . . into life.”

    How fortunate are we, to be free, to be able to share, words so rare.  Hoorah, Ruth Minsky Sender. Welcome to HMTC.

    Mrs. Minsky Sender will be at HMTC on Sunday, May 19, 2019 at 3:00 pm for a poetry reading and book signing.  Please RSVP to info@hmtcli.org or (516)571-8040. $10 suggested donation; light refreshments will be served.

  • Film Screening: “Defining Moments”

    Defining Moments: The Civil Rights Movement in North Hempstead

    Sunday, March 31 at 1:00 PM

    The Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County’s David Taub Reel Upstanders Film Series presents a film screening of Defining Moments: The Civil Rights Movement in North Hempstead, with guest speakers North Hempstead Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth; Town of North Hempstead Councilwoman Lee Seeman; and Director Alan Ginsburg.

    Defining Moments highlights the true stories of courage, confrontation, triumph, and sorrow throughout the Civil Rights Movement in North Hempstead, which was an epicenter of change during this tumultuous time. The documentary also focuses on the unique partnership forged between the local Jewish population and the Town’s African American residents as they worked towards the common goal of equality and human rights for all.

    $10 suggested donation.  Please RSVP to (516) 571-8040 or info@hmtcli.org.

  • Friedlander Upstander Award Winner: Sage Gladstone

    Sage Gladstone (3rd from right), a student at South Woods Middle School was a winner of the 2018 Friedlander Upstander Award at at HMTC’s 2018 Tolerance Benefit. Her essay below demonstrates that she has acted as an Upstander against bullying and intolerance.

    Taking action, helping others, and making a difference.  Those are my values and my purpose in life.  I love constantly pushing for a better world, not just speaking about it.  I take initiative and make my ideas come to life.  My sense of responsibility to the world outside of mine is what drives me to help people.  I want to live in a world that is caring, promotes peace, and celebrates differences.  However, I know that can’t happen overnight, and maybe can’t ever happen, but I wake up every day to work towards my goal, rise above obstacles, and be an Upstander for all.

    I have been striving to fulfill that goal of mine since I was five years old.  When I was in kindergarten, I saw that there was a girl a few grades above me who didn’t have any hair.  I felt sad, confused, and worried that she may get made fun of or laughed at, so I wanted to help.  I wanted to show her that someone cared and was thinking about her, so I went home that day to ask my mom if I could cut my hair and just give it to her,  My mom said I couldn’t’ do exactly that but I could donate my hair to people just like her.  Even in my five-year-old mind, I was totally on board with the idea that I could make someone’s day or life better from just one small act.  A few months later, I cut my hair to the point where it looked like I should be dancing the Charleston with my flapper friends, and donated it to Locks of Love.  I did that two more times when I was in fourth grade and this past summer, between seventh and eighth grade.  I realized I was slowly making a change… a change that I wanted to see in our world.

    It has always been a priority of mine to acknowledge others and their feelings because it’s important to appreciate the work that everyone does.  I try to spread my appreciation to people who make our world go around but are sometimes forgotten like the bus drivers, security guards, custodians, and lunch servers.   I also think it is important to stand up to unkind behavior wherever I am.  I will not tolerate rude remarks, bullying, or peer pressure.  Even if doing the right thing is the unpopular choice to make in a situation, I will do it for the sake of the people being hurt.

    Last year, I began many new initiatives at my school to help work towards the change I want to see.  For example, I organized a welcoming committee that invited all of our new students to come and play games and talk about their experiences in our school so far.  I wanted to make sure all the students felt noticed and welcomed.

    When I was home sick with the flu last year, I watched a video online about an amazing non-profit organization called Days for Girls.  This organization assembles sustainable feminine hygiene kits to donate to girls in impoverished areas around the world such as Nepal, parts of India, Haiti and so many other places.  Without the proper materials, these girls end up missing up to five days a week each month with most girls ending up having a deprived education.  Without an education it’s hard for these girls to achieve their goals and pursue their dreams.  These kits aren’t only giving them the items every girl needs, it’s giving them a future… a life to look forward to.  These girls are punished for something that is so natural in every girl’s life and are sent to huts to deal with it by themselves.  While they are in these huts, most commonly refereed to as chhaupadis, their biggest fear isn’t trying to make sure they are staying clean and healthy, it’s worrying about being raped.  These huts are in the middle of nowhere with hardly any protection from any of those vicious men.  After I watched the video, I went to their website to find the Days for Girls’ phone number so I could contact them and see what I could do to help.  When I called, they listed a bunch of volunteer opportunities for me to be apart of.  I thought hosting a drive to collect the materials needed for these kits was the best option.  Once I recovered from the flu and was back at school, I attended a meeting with my feminist club and shared what I had learned about the organization, and pitched the idea of holding a drive.  My club advisers and peers loved the idea but we couldn’t start it just yet because it was too late in the year.  So, we saved my idea for this year.  Over the summer I kept in contact with Days for Girls, collecting all the information I needed to launch a successful drive.  In the fall, I went back to school and planned logistics for this drive to work in meetings with my principal and many conversations with Days for Girls representatives.  Soon, I was ready to put boxes out and have donations roll in.  I really wanted this to be a successful drive so I contacted a representative named Kathy from a local team and asked her to come and speak at my school on behalf of Days for Girls.  We set up a date, and asked students to come listen and learn about Days for Girls at their lunch periods; we had a rather well turn our and even a boy showed up.  It was amazing to have my peers have the opportunity to be educated on an organization that its so important and amazing but yet a forgotten world issue.  After Thanksgiving break we put out donation boxes and I created posters to decorate our school with.  I loved Kathy’s presentation, but I still wanted to teach more about this wonderful organization, so I created a presentation and lectured in health classes about why it is important to donate.  After about a month of running the toiletry drive, my mom and I delivered our four overflowing boxes of donations to Dumont, New Jersey, where Kathy lives.  Throughout this whole experience, I kept in touch with Allie, a representative at the Days for Girls headquarters in Washington State.  After multiple calls and emails, Allie reached out to me and asked if she could feature my story in the Days for Girls monthly newsletter.  Of course I said yes, and Allie congratulated me for being the youngest volunteer to be featured.  My responsibility does not end with one successful drive.  I’m still committed to spreading the message of Days for Girls and will continue to raise awareness at my school.  Next month, I will hold a second drive as well as continue to educate my peers with a global awareness exhibit I’ve organized at my school’s awareness fair.

    The problems needed to be addressed in order to achieve my ideal world does not stop with menstruation.  While we have different religions, talents, hobbies, and beliefs, I know we all have the power to be kind.  I am driven to encourage kindness not only through the halls of my school, but also out in our world.  I am currently in the process of spearheading many kindness movements at my school.  The main project is the Blue Box Campaign where students receive a classmate’s name and are encouraged to write an anonymous compliment about them.  I am also setting it up for teachers.  The main purpose of this movement is to encourage people to make others feel good about themselves and to spread the idea that we can all uplift each other with a simple gesture.  I’m also launching a kindness mural project, where all students are asked to write their definition of kindness.  After everyone’s definition is collected, I will create the mural in a hallway at my school.  The process of each student writing their unique definition of kindness will make them have to consider what being kind actually means to them.  I will also kick off a Token of Kindness Project where Peer Mediators will carry around stickers that have quotes abut kindness on them.  When we see acts of kindness during the school day we will give them out.  This project is designed to let everyone know that all acts of kindness, big or small, never go unnoticed.  To tie all of the kindness projects together, I will be organizing another kindness moment called Kind Hands of South Woods for students and teachers to paint their hands and leave their hand prints on a piece of paper.  This resembles their pledge to be kind and contribute positivity to our school.  I hope I will be able to cement the value of Kindness into the minds of my peers as I launch these initiatives.

    My sense of responsibility to change our world for the better and promote kindness doesn’t just end with humans, I believe I should show the same respect to animals.  I became a vegetarian in kindergarten because I felt really bad at the thought that I was eating another living thing.  However, sticking with those eating habits got difficult especially at such a young age and I was only a vegetarian sporadically, until this past summer when I watched a few documentaries about the vegan diet.  Last month marked 6 month of being vegan, this experience proved to me that helping other human or not is something that I care strongly about and I am willing to do it and not give up.

    “Be the change you want to see in the world” is a powerful quote that I think best sums up my vision for being an Upstander.  I will always push for a better world and challenge myself on how I can make an even larger impact than the day before.  Through high school, college, adulthood, and when I’m old, I will continue to be an Upstander, someone who will never forget the importance of advocating for others and love for helping them.  I hope to spread this message of helping the people around you and thinking about lives beyond your own to all the beautiful humans on this planet we share.

    Are you an Upstander?

    If you have a story that sounds like Sage’s and you are a Middle or High School student from Nassau or Suffolk Counties, share it with us! You might be one of our 2019 Friedlander Upstander Winners.

    Apply via the link below:

    Friedlander Upstander Awards

    Or mail to:

    Helen Turner | Friedlander Upstander Award, 100 Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove, NY 11542

    For more information please call: (516) 571-8040 or email helenturner@hmtcli.org.

     

     

  • “Dirty Jewess”

    “Dirty Jewess: Testimony by a Child of Auschwitz Survivors and Her Escape from Soviet Occupation and Antisemitism” by Silvia Fishbaum

    Sunday, March 10, 2019 at 1:00 pm at HMTC

    A Unique Memoir about Jewish Life under Communism in Postwar Czechoslovakia

    Silvia Fishbaum, the child of Holocaust Survivors, will share her story about growing up in an Orthodox Jewish family during the Soviet occupation of Czechoslovakia.  She will describe the oppression and antisemitism that her family faced, and her bold decision to escape from Communist tyranny.  After the program, she will sign copies of her unique memoir, Dirty Jewess: A Woman’s Courageous Journey to Religious and Political Freedom.

    $10 suggested donation.  Please RSVP to (516) 571-8040 or info@hmtcli.org

  • 2019 Chinese New Year Banquet

    2019 Chinese New Year Banquet

    benefiting

    Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center of Nassau County

    Thursday, January 31, 2019, at 7 p.m.

    Come celebrate Chinese New Year with us at the 2019 Chinese New Year Banquet, on Thursday, January 31, 2019, at 7 p.m. at a restaurant in Nassau County (restaurant name and location to be revealed the week of the banquet). Tickets are $95 a person and includes multiple courses, wines matched to the food and gratuity. All proceeds go towards HMTC’s educational programming.

    Space is limited. Reservations are accepted with payment in full. Send checks, made out to HMTC, to: HMTC, 100 Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove, NY 11542, Attn: D. Lom. For more information contact Harriet Becker at (516) 466-4761 or ebottomsup@mac.com.

     

     

     

  • Film Screening: “Equal Means Equal”

    The Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center’s 

    David Taub Reel Upstanders Film Series 

    presents

    a screening of the documentary film 

    Equal Means Equal 

    The Equal Rights Amendment in the U.S.
    Where are we?
    Why isn’t it law yet?
    What are we to do about it?

    Special Guest Speaker: 
    Renaire Frierson,
    former Deputy Mayor, incorporated village of Freeport and former counsel, Executive Director at Nassau County Commission on Human Rights

    January 13, 2019, at 1 p.m. 

    HMTC
    Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road
    Glen Cove, NY 11542

    Equal Means Equal offers an unflinching look at how women are treated in the United States today. Examining both real-life stories and precedent-setting legal cases, director Kamala Lopez uncovers how outdated and discriminatory attitudes inform and influence seemingly disparate issues, from workplace harassment to domestic violence, rape and sexual assault to the foster care system, and the healthcare conglomerate to the judicial system. Along the way, she reveals the inadequacy of present laws that claim to protect women, ultimately presenting a compelling and persuasive argument for the urgency of ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment.

    The David Taub Reel Upstanders Film Series was established in honor of David Taub (1932-2010), a Holocaust Survivor and respected friend of the Center.

    Light refreshments will be served. Suggested donation of $10 to attend. RSVP to (516) 571-8040 or info@hmtcli.org.