• International Holocaust Remembrance Day

    International Holocaust Remembrance Day

    Sunday, January 26, 2019 | 1:00 PM

    At the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County

    In observance of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, HMTC will host a screening of “Jan Karski and the Lords of Humanity,” with commentary by the film’s award-winner director, Slavomir Grunberg.

    $10 suggested donation.  Light refreshments will be served.  Please RSVP to (516)571-8040 or info@hmtcli.org.

  • Why People Follow Orders

    Stanley Milgram’s “Obedience” Experiments: Why People Follow Orders

    Sunday, December 8, 2019 | 1:00 PM

    At the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County

    A Discussion of American social physiologist Stanley Milgram’s 1961 experiments, including a screening of Milgram’s own documentary film, with Dr. Thorin Tritter, Museum and Programming Director, HMTC.

    $10 suggested donation.  Light refreshments will be served.  Please RSVP to (516)571-8040 or info@hmtcli.org.

  • The New Antisemitism and the BDS Movement

    The New Antisemitism and the BDS Movement

    Wednesday, December 4, 2019

    11:00 AM

    At the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County

    Dr. Linda Burghardt will present a special lecture discussion on BDS.  The international movement for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions against Israel – known as BDS – has once again raised old questions about the legitimacy of Zionism and even the right of the State of Israel to exist.  Is this a call for social justice, as its Palestinian leaders claim, or a new form of the virulent anti-Semitism that led to the Holocaust?

    $10 suggested donation.  Light refreshments will be served.  Please RSVP to (516)571-8040 or info@hmtcli.org.

  • Witnessing Hate from Afar

    Sunday, November 10, 2019

    1:00 PM

    At the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County

    To mark the 81st anniversary of “Kristallnacht,” Thorin Tritter will give a talk about what information Americans learned about the pogroms of November 9 and 10, 1938 in Germany, and how quickly news of those events crossed the Atlantic. Drawing on newspaper of the time and autobiographical accounts, Dr. Tritter will explore the event as Americans saw it. He will also compare the news stories from 1938 with news stories that have covered contemporary hate speech and atrocities, asking the audience to think about what are the lessons that we should draw from the past when facing genocides and atrocities in distant places today.

    $10 suggested donation. Light refreshments will be served.   Please RSVP to info@hmtcli.org or (516)571-8040.

  • 3rd Annual Walk the Talk

    3rd Annual Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center Walk the Talk… Never Again!

    Walk to Support Long Island’s Leading Holocaust Institution

    Grand Marshal: Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas

    Sunday, October 27, 2019

    at the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County

    Welwyn Preserve | 100 Crescent Beach Road | Glen Cove, NY 11542

    All are welcome to participate.  For more information, please contact Deborah Lom at dlom@hmtcli.org or call (516)571-8040.

    Donations of $25 and above by October 20 will recieve a tee-shirt.

    Register online today!

    (Please limit online registration to one per person; ask that all members of your team register individually.)

    http://weblink.donorperfect.com/walk2019

    Sponsorship levels:

    UPSTANDER: $25,000

    RESCUER: $20,000

    HERO: $15,000

    DEFENDER: $10,000

    GUARDIAN: $5,000

    ANGEL: $2,500

    PROTECTOR: $1,000

    FRIEND: $500

    All proceeds goes towards HMTC’s educational programming which uses the lessons of the Holocaust to educate about the danger of antisemitsm, bullying, and all forms of intolerance.

     

  • Zegota: The Council for Aid to Jews

    Zegota: The Council for Aid to Jews

    Sunday, October 20, 2019 at 1:00 PM

    HMTC will shed light on a secret organization that saved Jews in Poland during the Holocaust as part of a program, “Zegota: The Council for Aid to Jews.”  Consul General of the Republic of Poland, Maciej Golubiewski will be the keynote speaker.

    The program will serve as the launch of a special exhibition at HMTC about “Zegota.” The exhibition will be on display at HMTC through December 22, 2019.

    Light refreshments will be served. There is a suggested admission of $10 to attend. Seating is limited and reservations in advance are required. To register, call (516) 571-8040 or email info@hmtcli.org.

    In partnership with the Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in New York and the Institute of National Remembrance in Warsaw.

  • David Taub Reel Upstanders Film Series Presents a Screening of “Prosecuting Evil: The Extraordinary World of Ben Ferencz

    Join HMTC for a film screening of the documentary Prosecuting Evil: The Extraordinary World of Ben Ferencz

    Sunday, October 6, 2019 at 1:00 PM

    Barry Avrich’s gripping new documentary tells the fascinating story of Ben Ferencz—the last surviving Nuremberg prosecutor and lifelong advocate of “law not war.” After witnessing Nazi concentration camps shortly after liberation, Ferencz became lead prosecutor in the Einsatzgruppen case at Nuremberg, which has been called the biggest murder trial in history. He was 27 years old and it was his first trial. All 22 Nazi officials tried for murdering over a million people were convicted. Ferencz went on to advocate for restitution for Jewish victims of the Holocaust and later for the establishment of the International Criminal Court. His fight for justice for victims of atrocity crimes continues today.

    We will be joined by John Q. Barrett, a Professor of Law at St. John’s University in New York City, where he teaches Constitutional Law, Criminal Procedure, and Legal History.  He also is the Elizabeth S. Lenna Fellow and a Board member at the Robert H. Jackson Center in Jamestown, New York. He is the author of many articles and lectures on both the national and international scene about Robert H. Jackson (1892-1954) who was a U.S. Supreme Court Justice and Nuremberg chief prosecutor.

    $10 suggested donation; light refreshments will be served.  Pleas RSVP to (516)571-8040 or info@hmtcli.org

    The David Taub Reel Upstanders Film Series was established in honor of David Taub (1932-2010), a Holocaust Survivor and respected friend of the Center.

  • Press Release: “The Holocaust: History and Lessons

    The Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County Hosts “The Holocaust: History and Lessons”

    Thursday, October 10, Thursday, October 24, and Wednesday, October 30

    10:00 AM – 3:00 PM

    Glen Cove, NY… The Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center (HMTC) hosts “The Holocaust: History and Lessons” a three session interactive seminar focusing on history, roles, choices, and behaviors on Thursday, October 10, Thursday, October 24, and Wednesday, October 30 from 10 am through 3 pm at HMTC, Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove, NY 11542.

    This adult seminar is an introductory course in the history of the Holocaust from its beginnings in antisemitism through the Final Solution.  Participants will investigate the roles, choices, and behaviors observed during the Holocaust and how we can apply them to contemporary issues.  The seminar will be facilitated by Gail Kastenolz and Meryl Menashe, two Second Generation Holocaust Survivors, speakers, long-time museum educators, and leaders in Holocaust education.

    Over the course of the three sessions, participants will participate in a docent-led tour of HMTC’s state-of-the-art museum and hear testimony from a Holocaust Survivor.  Additionally, participants will sit-in on a panel in which Second Generation Holocaust Survivors will discuss their experiences as children of Holocaust Survivors and how it has affected their lives from the professions they have chosen to the way they work to prevent hate every day.

    There is a $100 fee per participant; light breakfast, lunch, and materials included.  To register please call (516)571-8040 or email info@hmtcli.org.  To learn more about this program please visit www.hmtcli.org/events.

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  • 15th Annual Smithsonian Museum Day

     The Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center of Nassau County (HMTC) will open its doors free of charge to all Museum Day ticketholders on Saturday, September 21, 2019 as part of Smithsonian magazine’s 15th annual Museum Day, a national celebration of curiosity in which participating museums emulate the free admission policy at the Smithsonian Institution’s Washington DC based museums.

    The theme of this year’s Museum Day is the Smithsonian Year of Music, celebrating music as a reflection of human creativity and innovation as well as a key method of communication and cross-cultural exchange and understanding.  The Smithsonian Year of Music crosses disciplines, bringing together music-related resources in art, history, culture, science, and education.  At HMTC’s state-of-the-art museum, you can view one of the “instruments of survival,” an accordion donated by Holocaust Survivor Alex Rosner.  Rosner learned to play the accordion while imprisoned and attributes his musical talents to his survival.  Rosner and his father spent time at Oskar Schindler’s factory prior to their deportation to Auschwitz-Birkenau and are depicted in the 1993 film Schindler’s List.

    For more information contact HMTC at (516) 571-8040 or visit Smithsonian.com/MuseumDay.

  • Synopsis: “Prosecuting Evil: The Extraordinary World of Ben Ferencz”

    Prosecuting Evil: The Extraordinary World of Ben Ferencz

    Check out the Trailer!

    Armenia, the Holocaust, Uganda, Cambodia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Sudan, Syria, Myanmar. The list of atrocities against humanity in our time is tragically long, and incomprehensible.

    Barry Avrich’s gripping documentary PROSECUTING EVIL: THE EXTRAORDINARY WORLD OF BEN FERENCZ tells the fascinating story of one man’s lifelong quest for justice for victims of crimes against humanity – a concept Ferencz was instrumental in developing after The Nuremberg Trials post-World War II.

    A true visionary, a key architect of the international war crimes system and passionate advocate for peace, Ben Ferencz has lived a remarkable life. At 98 years old, the last living lead prosecutor at The Nuremberg Trials remains an active and unstoppable force for justice in an unjust world. He’s witnessed and influenced the most consequential chapters of the last 70 years – from liberating war camps and investigating Nazi war crimes, to acting, at 27 years old, as the Chief Prosecutor for the U.S. Army at the Einsatzgruppen Trials at Nuremberg and successfully advocating for the establishment of the International Criminal Court in The Hague. Through it all he’s never wavered in his vision of a world that finds peace through the force of law, not the force of war.

    There’s nothing in Ben Ferencz’s earliest years to suggest the trajectory his life would take, and the history he would make. The son of Romanian immigrants fleeing anti-Semitism for New York City, Ferencz was born in 1920, and his small stature and poor English delayed his education. Nonetheless, he won a scholarship to Harvard Law School.

    Ferencz joined the U.S. Army serving in the 115th AAA Gun Battalion. In 1945, he was transferred to the headquarters of General Patton’s Third Army, and tasked with setting up a war crimes branch and collecting evidence. In this function, he was sent to the concentration camps as they were liberated by the U.S. Army. His assignment was to collect all the evidence of the crimes for future trials. The first camp he hit was Buchenwald. What he saw traumatized him for the rest of his life and fueled his desire to see a world in which those responsible for crimes against humanity are held to account. He gathered enough incriminating evidence to prosecute 22 Einsatzgruppen Nazis, responsible for murdering over a million people – a trial of which he was the lead prosecutor at the Nuremberg war crimes trials. Called the biggest murder trial in history, Ferencz was only 27 years old, and it was his first case.

    After the trials, Ferencz went on to advocate for restitution for Jewish victims of the Holocaust and later the establishment of the International Criminal Court. He also published several books on this subject. Already in his first book published in 1975, entitled Defining International Aggression-The Search for World Peace, he argued for the establishment of such an international court. In 2009, Ferencz was awarded the Erasmus Prize, the award is given to individuals or institutions that have made notable contributions to European culture, society, or social science. In April 2017, the municipality of The Hague announced that the city will honor Benjamin Ferencz by naming the footpath next to the Peace Palace after him as “one of the figureheads of international justice”.

    PROSECUTING EVIL includes a treasure trove of archival footage and photos that bring Ferencz’s world to life. The film was shot in Toronto, New York City, Nuremberg, The Hague, Delray Beach Florida, Chicago and Ottawa. It features interviews with top minds working in the fields of human and civil rights and international justice including Alan Dershowitz, Justice Rosalie Abella, General Wesley Clark (Ret.), David Scheffer, first U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues; Richard Dicker, Director, Human Rights Watch International Justice Program; Fatou Bensouda, Chief Prosecutor, International Criminal Court and Don Ferencz who has followed in his father’s footsteps as an attorney and international justice educator.

    Ferencz’s relentless vision, and his message in PROSECUTING EVIL is that there is little sense in denouncing aggression, terrorism, and other crimes against humanity unless these offenses became part of an accepted international criminal code enforced by an international court that delivers a structure for peace. Ferencz believes that if law trumps war, you could change the world. His mantra remains “Law not war”