• 2019 Chinese New Year Banquet

    2019 Chinese New Year Banquet

    benefiting

    Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center of Nassau County

    Thursday, January 31, 2019, at 7 p.m.

    Join us for the 2019 Chinese New Year Banquet celebrating the “Year of the Pig,” on Thursday, January 31, 2019, at 7 p.m. at a restaurant in Nassau County (restaurant name and location to be revealed the week of the banquet). Tickets are $95 a person and includes multiple courses, wines matched to the food and gratuity. All proceeds go towards HMTC’s educational programming.

    Space is limited. Reservations are accepted with payment in full. Send checks, made out to HMTC, to HMTC, 100 Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove, NY 11542, Attn: D. Lom. For more information contact Harriet Becker at (516) 466-4761 or ebottomsup@mac.com.

     

     

     

  • Lecture: “Jewish Humor & The Holocaust: Amusing? Confusing? Offensive?”

    Jewish Humor and the Holocaust:
    Amusing? Confusing? Offensive?

    A lecture presentation by

    Dr. Linda F. Burghardt
    Scholar-in-Residence, HMTC

    Friday, November 30, 2018, at 11 a.m.

    HMTC
    Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road
    Glen Cove, NY

    What made us laugh in the old days of Sid Caesar and Milton Berle is a far cry from the jokes and stories told by Larry David, Sarah Silverman and other contemporary comics today. But even if it seems like nothing is really off-limits anymore, do we want to hear Jewish comedians referencing the Holocaust for laughs? Join us on Friday, November 30 and you’ll see why figuring out what’s funny can be serious business.

    Dr. Linda F. Burghardt, the Scholar-in-Residence at HMTC, is a journalist and author from Great Neck, NY. She worked as a freelance reporter for The New York Times for 20 years and is the author of three non-fiction books. Her articles and essays have appeared in newspapers across the U.S., and she has lectured to both national and international audiences. She holds a Ph.D. from LIU Post and is the daughter of Holocaust Survivors from Vienna.

    There is a suggested donation of $10. For more information or to RSVP call (516) 571-8040 or email axelsarmiento@hmtcli.org.

  • 26th Annual Tribute Dinner

    Wednesday, November 14, 2018
    at
    Woodbury Jewish Center


     

    Individual tickets for the 26th Annual Tribute Dinner are $450 a person. Sponsorship packages and digital journal ads are available. For more information or to purchase tickets, sponsorship or a journal ad, contact Deborah Lom, Director of Development, at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org.

    Tribute Dinner 2018

    $0.00

    Diamond Sponsor


    Diamond Sponsor $50,000

    • Premiere Seating for 12 Guests
    • Diamond ad in digital journal

    Platinum Sponsor for $25,000


    Platinum Sponsor $25,000

    • Prominent Program Seating for 12 Guests
    • Platinum ad in digital journal

    Gold Sponsor


    Gold Sponsor $18,000

    • Prime Program Seating for 12 Guests
    • Gold ad in digital journal

    Silver Sponsor $10,000


    Silver Sponsor $10,000

    • Program Seating for 10 Guests
    • Silver ad in digital journal

    Bronze Sponsor $5,000


    Bronze Sponsor $5,000

    • Program Seating for 10 Guests
    • Bronze ad in digital journal

    Patron Sponsor $2,500


    Patron Sponsor $2,500

    • Program Seating for 4 Guests
    • Patron recognition in digital journal

    Benefactor $1,000


    Benefactor $1,000

    • Program Seating for 2 guests
    • Benefactor recognition in digital journal

    Individual Dinner Tickets $450


    Individual Dinner Tickets $450

    Young Professional (21-36) $250


    Young Professional (21-36) $250

    Journal Ad Only


    Journal Ad Only

    • In order to ensure inclusion in the Digital Journal, please submit artwork no later than November 1, 2018

    I/We cannot attend, but will make a donation


    I/We cannot attend, but will make a donation

    Share your donation with your friends and family!

    SKU: annualtributedinner-18 Category:

    Description

    Contributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.
    Information: contact Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org

  • “Kristallnacht” Refugees, Resistance and Rescue from 1938 to 2018

    “Kristallnacht”
    Refugees, Resistance and Rescue from 1938 to 2018

    An event for the 80th Commemoration of the November Pogrom


    Sunday, November 4, 2018, at 2 p.m.

    HMTC
    Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road
    Glen Cove, NY

    Suggested Donation of $10.
    RSVP to (516) 571-8040 or info@hmtcli.org.

     

  • 10th Annual Golf & Games Outing

     

    Individual golfers are $775 a person. A Classic Golf Package with one foursome is $3,000. Individual games players are $100 a person. Reserved games tables are $500 a table. Sponsorship opportunities are available.

    For more information contact Deborah Lom at (516) 571-8040 or dlom@hmtcli.org.

     

  • Annual Tolerance Benefit: Taste of Long Island

    Tolerance Benefit: Made on Long Island – Tasting Event and Silent Auction 2018

    $0.00

    $10,000 Name Sponsor

    $10,000 Name Sponsor

    • Provides programs to 600 students
    • 10 Tickets
    • Recognition on hmtcli.org and press releases
    • Event day signange

    $5,000 Corporate Sponsor


    $5,000 Corporate Sponsor

    • Provides programs to 300 students
    • 10 Tickets
    • Recognition on hmtcli.org
    • Event day signange

    $3,600 Sustaining Sponsor


    $3,600 Sustaining Sponsor

    • Provides programs to 100 students
    • 10 Tickets
    • Recognition on all pre-event publicity
    • Event day signage

    $1,250 Ten Pack Tickets


    $1,250 Ten Pack Tickets

    • Provides programs to 100 students
    • 10 Tickets

    $130 Individual Ticket


    $130 Individual Ticket

    Share your donation with your friends and family!

    SKU: ironchef-18 Category:

    Description

    Contributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.

  • Unknown Heroes: Chinese Rescuers During the Holocaust

    Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center
    of Nassau County

    presents

    Unknown Heroes:
    Chinese Rescuers During the Holocaust

    with keynote speaker
    Manli Ho,
    Daughter of Dr. Feng Shan H0

    Sunday, April 29, 2018, at 2 p.m.

    Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center
    Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road
    Glen Cove, NY

    Chinese nationals who engaged in rescue activities include a diplomat, university president and Chinese immigrants residing in Russia. We will bring to light the histories of the heroes and the Jews they rescued.

    There will be a special exhibition in conjunction with this program, “The Wings of The Phoenix: Dr. Feng Shan Ho and the Rescue of the Austrian Jews.”

    $10 suggested donation. Seating is limited, RSVP in advance is recommended. To RSVP contact Axel Sarmiento at (516) 571-8040 or axelsarmiento@hmtcli.org.

    Co-sponsored by the Chinese American Independent Practice Association (CAIPA).

  • The Shoah Through Muslim Eyes

    The Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center
    of Nassau County

    presents

    a special Yom Hashoah/
    Holocaust Memorial Day Program

    The Shoah Through Muslim Eyes

    with guest speaker

    Mehnaz Afridi, PhD
    Director of the Holocaust, Genocide, and
    Interfaith Education Center

    Manhattan College

    Sunday, April 15, 2018, at 2 p.m.

    Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center
    Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road
    Glen Cove, NY

    Dr. Afridi, a Muslim member of the USHMM Ethics and Religion Committee, will address Arab-Muslim views of the Holocaust and how they intersect with denial, antisemitism and anti-Zionism.

    “What remains even more painful for me as a Muslim is the denial of the Shoah among Muslims and Muslim nations.” – Dr. Mehnaz Afridi

    $10 suggested donation. Seating is limited, RSVP in advance is recommended. To RSVP contact Axel Sarmiento at (516) 571-8040 or axelsarmiento@hmtcli.org.

  • They Fought Back: 75th Memorial of the Warsaw Ghetto Revolt

    They Fought Back:
    75th Memorial of the Warsaw Ghetto Revolt

    Wednesday, April 11, 2018, at 11 a.m.

    Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center
    Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road
    Glen Cove, NY

    In April 1943, a small group of young starving Jewish fighters launched an attack against the German Army. Hear testimonies of their armed battles and spiritual mission.

    “Thousands of Germans surrounded us with machine guns and cannons as if they were at the Russian front. We were 20 young men and women with pistols and only two rifles. – Zivia Lubetkin, a leader of the revolt.

    $10 suggested donation. Seating is limited, RSVP in advance is recommended. To RSVP contact Axel Sarmiento at (516) 571-8040 or axelsarmiento@hmtcli.org.

  • Washington’s Promise to Minorities and its Meaning for our Center

     

    Washington’s Promise to Minorities and its Meaning for our Center

    by Frank Miller-Small

    It’s now no more that tolerance is spoken of as it were the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights…

    … the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance…

    Every one shall sit in safety under his own vine and fig tree and there shall be no one to make him afraid.

    — excerpted from George Washington’s letter to
    the Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island, 1790

    Our country’s rising tide of intolerance toward minorities caused me to wonder about our founders’ values and, if knowing that, might help our Center foster greater tolerance.  I wanted to know if, as some claim, we were intended to be a white Christian nation, relegating minorities to an inferior status.  Or, did our founders envision an egalitarian, multi-cultural America, with different groups living in harmony with each other?  Were Americans, perhaps, of mixed opinions on this issue? My search for answers led me to an insightful collection of essays entitled, “Washington’s Rebuke to Bigotry.”

    This book, written mostly by well- credentialed scholars, educators, and legal experts, explores the significance of our first president’s important, yet relatively little known, 1790 letter to the Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island. It further examines subsequent American responses to the intent of the letter.   To better comprehend the letter’s meaning at the time, the volume begins by providing an historical perspective, which I’ll briefly summarize below.

    At the letter’s writing, Rhode Island, founded by Puritan dissident Roger Williams in the mid-17th century, had long granted religious freedom to minorities, much to the disdain of the other colonies.  Concerned that its rights would be trampled upon, Rhode Island delayed ratifying statehood until the Bill of Rights (1791) promised religious liberty.

    Washington celebrated the new country’s unity by visiting Newport, and, while there, several religious groups gave welcoming speeches, the most memorable by Moses Seixas, president of the Hebrew Congregation. Several days later, Washington penned his famous letter, responding to the Jewish hope that America would treat them with greater tolerance than had been their long experience. Washington’s letter, highlights of which are quoted above, assured the Jews that all minorities would have equal freedom of religion under the law.  Moreover, the government, in our current idiom, would provide protection from “hate crimes” and other forms of prejudice. These promises, from a head of a national government, were revolutionary, unprecedented in the Western World.

    However, they didn’t arise in a vacuum. The amazing success of Rhode Island’s religious freedom experiment provided the main inspiration and model.  Enlightenment ideas and the ideals and recent victories of Madison and Jefferson to wean Virginia away from a state-supported Anglican Church also lent support.

    The intention of the letter and the way it was interpreted went well beyond promising religious freedom to the Jews.  Widely circulated, read and discussed, it gave hope of toleration to all minorities.  More than merely a legal doctrine, this letter presented a vision of a moral, idealistic, harmonious national community.

    Although embraced by minorities, many intellectuals, some leaders, and other sympathizers, the struggle for the fulfillment of this vision had just begun.  Several states continued to use tax support to promote the Christian religion.  Many states had religious tests for public office.  Remarkably, the main reason for eventual Church-State separation derived from the plethora of competing Protestant sects, each fearing the other’s government control, and the last government established Church persisted until 1833, in Massachusetts.  It took several more decades to attain full legal toleration of all religions at the state level.

    America’s initial ambivalence toward minorities, shown by the disparity between the letter’s lofty ideals and the states’ stubborn opposition to them, set the stage for subsequent ambivalent development.  This ambivalence began even with the founders’ original vision which contained some striking contradictions. Washington’s statements and the year-later Bill of Rights didn’t mention the rights of women, ethnic or racial minorities, or slaves.  Moreover, the negative ramifications of this ambivalence played out throughout most of US history, where Jews and other minorities were, at best, merely tolerated by the White Protestant majority.

    This conflict between ideals and realities exposes one of the central American moral paradoxes.  Although there has been and continues to be tremendous discrimination toward many minority groups, this co-exists with the ever-present and potent promise of an inclusive America.  This promise has roused the voices of toleration for many compassionate documents  and court decisions as well as fueled minority rights struggles by individuals and groups, such as the Emancipation Proclamation, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Marriage Equality Act.

    Armed with the knowledge of the paradoxical nature of Washington’s original vision and its aftermath, we can use this to help our Center broaden the circle of tolerance. We can use Washington’s promise as a springboard to conversations about our present state of minority rights.  We can hold up the examples of the choices American upstanders, such as George Washington and Martin Luther King, made to promote greater minority inclusion as courageous role models. We can employ the circumstances surrounding upstander and opposition choices to initiate and work through difficult and complex conversations about inclusion.

    We can relate these difficult conversations to the important idea, implied in Washington’s letter, that democracy can only work if people cooperate, and this can only happen if people feel free from prejudicial fear. Ideally, as John Dewey said, schools should be the training ground for democracy, the place where young people learn peaceful, cooperative living and its connection to the democratic process.  Unfortunately, many schools don’t have the time, interest, or capability to do this.

    Our Center fills this important void.  We make the democratic connection and provide the unique opportunity to have the aforementioned difficult conversations, helping students recognize and resolve differences by working through them in a civil way.  During this process, as Adam Strom, Facing History educator says, we help them “… separate fact from rumor by breaking own stereotypes and countering myth and misinformation.”  This is what our Center does so well and one reason why our Center is so much needed, particularly, in these troubled times.

    If we can integrate the lessons borne of the American struggle toward inclusion with the lessons of tolerance learned from the Holocaust, this dual focus will brighten our torch to illuminate the dark places in our midst.

    To charge our energies for this challenge, we can summon the words of African –American poet, Langston Hughes, to resound in our ears:

    O, yes I say it plain

    America never was America to me,

    And yet I swear this oath –

    America will be!

    May his faith be ours, and may it inspire us, as we go back to the trenches, to carry forth the spirit of Washington’s letter, despite the strong headwinds, and continue our vital work.